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FAQ

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

SHIPPING & PAYMENT INFORMATION

WHEN WILL MY ORDER SHIP?

After your payment is verified, it takes up to 24 hours to process and ship your order. This does not include weekends or holidays. Purchases made after 9 am EST will not be shipped out until the next business day. If you order after 9 am EST on a Friday, your order will likely be shipped out on the following Monday.

WILL I HAVE TO PAY INTERNATIONAL TAXES & DUTIES?

Your order may be subject to import duties and taxes, which are levied once a shipment reaches your country. The general amount for the duties and taxes fee is about 20% of the dollar amount of the merchandise. However, this is just a general guideline and may vary depending on the country to which the order was shipped. You should contact your customs office for specific amounts and percentages.

WB STILO cannot control and is not responsible for any duties/taxes applied to your package. You will be responsible for paying additional charges for customs clearance. Customs policies vary widely from country to country; please contact your local customs office for further information. Note, in rare occasions custom agents may delay delivery of some packages.

HOW ARE TAXES AND DUTIES CALCULATED?

For Duties Delivered Paid (DDP) Orders: Duties and taxes may be included in the price depending on ship to country. If not included in the price, they will be shown at checkout.

For Duties Delivered Unpaid (DDU) Orders: As the customer, you are liable for all import duties, customs and taxes levied. Payment of these is required to release your order from customs on arrival.

ORDER INFORMATION & CONCERNS

I NEED TO CHANGE SOMETHING ON MY ORDER. HOW CAN I DO THAT?

If you need to change or cancel your order, please CONTACT US immediately. Once our warehouse has processed your order, we will be unable to make any changes.

MY ORDER STATUS SAYS "UNFULFILLED". WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

"Unfulfilled" just means that we successfully received your order! Once your order is shipped, you'll receive a tracking number and your order status will change to "Fulfilled."

WHY WAS MY ORDER CANCELED?

If your order was unexpectedly cancelled, chances are that our fraud filter marked your order as fraudulent. If you are certain that that is not true, please order again with a Paypal account. If you do not have Paypal, you can easily sign up at www.Paypal.com

WATCH SPECS & WARRANTY

WATCH SPECS & WARRANTY

We didn't look past one feature when designing WB STILO. With this said, we went with a Japanese Miyota Precision Quartz Movement which is one of the most well known in the industry.

ARE WB STILO WATCHES WATERPROOF?

Most of our watches are water proof or water resistant. Please read the product specifications to make sure. Also, please avoid all contact with water, as WATER DAMAGE IS NOT COVERED UNDER WARRANTY. Some watches have a water resistance of 5 ATM and can withstand a brief submersion under water (i.e. hand washing), but should not be taken swimming or bathing. Some of our Adventure series watches have a 10ATM rating and can be taken swimming at the surface or snorkeling at a shallow depth, but cannot be taken SCUBA diving.

WHAT TYPE OF LEATHER IS USED?

Our leather straps are made of genuine cow-hide leather.

WHAT IS THE GLASS MADE OF?

The glass we use for our watches is made of hardened mineral crystal.

WHY ARE THE HANDS ON MY SUBDIALS NOT POINTING STRAIGHT UP? (some watch models only)

This is actually a very simple fix, please see the instructions below.

IF THE MIDDLE SUBDIAL POINTER IS POINTED TO THE RIGHT:

Simply pull the crown (knob to adjust the time) out 2 clicks and then press the bottom button on your watch. This will make the subdial hand jump back one second at a time. Do this until the hand is straight.

IF THE MIDDLE SUBDIAL POINTER IS POINTED TO THE LEFT:

Simply pull the crown (knob to adjust the time) out 2 clicks and then press the top button on your watch. This will make the subdial hand jump forward one second at a time. Do this until the hand is straight.

IF THE FAR LEFT SUB-DIAL IS NOT CENTERED, YOU WILL NEED TO PRESS THE CORRECT BUTTON (REFERENCE ABOVE) CONTINUOUSLY. THE STOPWATCH MINUTE HAND (FAR LEFT DIAL) IS SYNCHRONIZED WITH STOPWATCH SECOND HAND (MIDDLE DIAL).

Hope this makes sense, if you have ANY issues please don't hesitate to ask.

IS THERE A WARRANTY?

WB STILO has a limited warranty that covers manufacturer's defects for two years after the original purchase date from an authorized dealer. Basically, if the watch parts or mechanics don't work properly, and it's our fault, we will repair or replace your product for free. However, this does not cover any abuse you might put your watch through on your own. The warranty does not cover water damage, normal wear and tear, batteries, accidental glass damage, scratches, strap damage, or theft. Proof of purchase is required for all warranty claims and service requests, so please keep your receipt. If you've purchased from our site or Amazon, the order number will suffice; otherwise you will need to send us a copy of the receipt from an authorized WB STILO dealer.

WHAT TYPE OF BATTERY IS USED?

The batteries for our watches are can be SONY SR626SW or SONY SR621SW.

HOW DO I REPLACE MY BATTERY?

All of our watch batteries can be found at any electronic store, as well as most watch repair or jewelry shops. Any watch repair shop or Jeweler should be able to assist you with the battery replacement. We don't suggest replacing the battery, as it requires some special tools and you could damage the watch.

SUNGLASS SPECS & WARRANTY

ARE THEY UV PROTECTED?

All of our sunglasses are UV 400 protected, which blocks all light rays with wavelengths up to 400 nanometers. (This covers all of UVA and UVB rays.)

DO YOU OFFER PRESCRIPTION LENSES?

At the moment we do not provide prescription services. However, our frames are capable of being fitted for prescription lenses. Any optometrist should be able to assist you further.

WHAT DOES 'POLARIZED' MEAN?

Polarized sunglasses are specialized eyewear designed to reduce glare from surfaces such as water, snow, and glass. Glare distorts the true color of objects and makes them harder to distinguish. The main difference is that polarized lenses are designed specifically to block the glare from reflected light while non-polarized lenses only block intense light.

IS THERE A WARRANTY?

WB STILO warrants that our sunglasses are free from manufacturing defects (in material or workmanship) for a period of 1 year from the date of purchase. This does not cover scratches on lenses, damages caused by accident, abuse, neglect, improper use or storage of the product, unauthorized modifications, or normal wear and tear.

BRACELET WARRANTY

IS THERE A WARRANTY?

WB STILO warrants that the bracelets will be free from manufacturing defects (in material or workmanship) for a period of 1 year from the date of purchase. We must be notified if the product arrives damaged upon delivery. The warranty does not cover any normal wear and tear, scratches, or lost/stolen items. Bracelets must be used and maintained appropriately. Any abuse or misuse of bracelets will void the warranty.

WATER RESISTANCE GUIDE

CAN YOU GUYS EXPLAIN IT ALL?

If your watch says it's water resistant up to 30 meters, that means you can dive with it down to 30 meters, right? Wrong. You can destroy your watch that way. Though the dial or back of the case may give you a number, that number probably doesn't refer to in-use scenarios, or is a reflection of a standardized water resistance classification. When in doubt, always err towards the dry side.

WATER RESISTANT

If your watch doesn't say it's water resistant, treat it as if it's a piece of paper. Water can do terrible things to it. If it does mention a vague sort of water resistance, still avoid getting it wet. A splash will be okay, but definitely not a good idea to go for a dip or shower with it on — especially since a hot shower's steam can do even more horrible things to your watch's seals than water.

WATER RESISTANT 30 METERS/ 3 ATMOSPHERES/ 3 BAR

If your watch claims to be water resistant to 30 meters, it actually means it's just splash resistant. It does NOT mean the watch will be fine if you bring it 30 meters below sea level. While it's certainly possible that your watch could survive an extremely brief trip under very careful conditions in extremely still water, you probably shouldn't roll the dice.

WATER RESISTANT 50 METERS/ 5 ATMOSPHERES/ 5 BAR

So you've got a watch with 50 meters of water resistance. Congratulations, you are hereby allowed to swim with it. However, you should minimize exposure to the water and probably still take it off. And by no means whatsoever should you dive with your watch. 50 meters of depth will not do it any favors.

WATER RESISTANT 100 METERS/ 10 ATMOSPHERES/ 10 BAR

This is snorkeling territory. A watch with 100 meters of water resistance has no problem hanging out in the water for a while, and will even be fine on an extended snorkeling excursion. Diving, however, should still be out of the question.

WATER RESISTANT 200 METERS/ 20 ATMOSPHERES/ 20 BAR

Though it might seem like it, this actually isn't dive watch territory. While 200 meters seems like a ton of leeway to scuba dive with, even down 10 meters, it's probably best not to risk it. But by all means, do some laps in the pool with these on. But only push the buttons with your wrist above water.

WATER RESISTANT 300 METERS/ 30 ATMOSPHERES/ 30 BAR

This is the dive watch territory, even though it hasn't been certified to the ISO 6425 standard. Go get wet.

DIVER'S OR ISO 6425

If your watch has "ISO 6425" or "Divers" and then a depth number written on the dial or case, you've got a watch designed for diving and certified up to a standard — unlike watches without ISO markings. This ISO standard means the watch is guaranteed by the manufacturer to handle depths of at least 100 meters (if no number is given) as well as an extra 25 percent of that depth if the water is completely static. Additionally, watches that measure up to this standard have significant shock, magnetic, and salt water tolerance, and provide an indication that it's running in total darkness. If you're going to go deep, go with one of these watches.

And remember, if your watch is vintage or you haven't checked your seals in a few years, all bets are off until you get your watch checked. Because this will happen.

WHAT IS A WATCH MOVEMENT?

WHAT IS A WATCH MOVEMENT?

A movement is what makes a watch “go.” Most watch companies purchase either the entire movement or parts of the movement from other companies. There are a handful of companies that are ‘vertically integrated’ and make their own movements without using any supplies from subcontractors. These companies are referred to as Manufactures, and the watches they make are typically more expensive and highly sought after because of their exclusivity.

MOVEMENT TYPES

Manual and automatic movements are mechanical; they are both made up of only mechanical parts like gears and springs. The quartz and auto-quartz movements have an electrical circuit and require a battery to run but may also have some mechanical parts. Mechanical watches are far more expensive than battery-powered ones because they are much more labor intensive to build. Even though battery watches are inherently more accurate, almost all collectors and connoisseurs prefer manual or automatic as these movements represent the accumulation of almost 600 years of refinement, expertise, and craftsmanship.

Manual Movement

Automatic Movement

Quartz Movement

MANUAL MOVEMENT

A manual movement, frequently called a hand-wound movement, is the oldest type of watch movement made, dating back to the 16th century. It requires daily winding in order to work. Manual movements are the most traditional movements and are usually found in very conservative, expensive, and collectable watches.

Important aspects to consider before purchasing a manual watch:

Daily winding is required.

When winding a manual watch, it should be wound until there is a feeling of tension or tightness on the crown. If it is wound past this point, damage to the movement may occur.

Remove the watch from the wrist prior to winding or setting. Failure to do so will cause damage to the movement, crown, and stem.

Components of the manual movement:

Crown

The wheel on the side of the watch that is used to set time. It can also be turned to wind the watch to run.

Mainspring

The power source of the movement. The kinetic energy from winding the crown is transferred to the coil-shaped mainspring, which stores the energy by getting tighter and tighter.

Gear Train

Transmits the stored energy from the mainspring to the escapement through a series of small gears.

Escapement

Acts like a brake, taking the energy transmitted from the mainspring through the gear train and pushing it out into equal, regular parts.

Balance Wheel

The heart of the movement, receiving the energy to run from the escapement. The balance wheel beats, or oscillates, in a circular motion between five and ten times per second. A watchmaker can make the balance wheel oscillate faster or slower, which in turn makes the watch run faster or slower.

Dial Train

Another series of gears that transmit the regulated, equally metered energy from the balance wheel to the hands of the watch, making them move.

Jewels

Synthetic rubies that are set at points of high friction, like the center of a gear that is constantly in motion. Used as bearings to reduce metal-to-metal friction and wear, they improve performance and accuracy. Rubies are used because they absorb heat well and are extremely hard.

How manual movements work:

1. Turning the crown winds the mainspring, causing it to store energy.

2. The gear train transfers the energy to the escapement.

3. The escapement meters out the energy into regulated parts.

4. The balance wheel uses this regulated energy to beat back and forth at a constant rate.

5. Every certain number of beats, the dial train transfers the energy to the hands of the watch.

6. The hands advance.

AUTOMATIC MOVEMENT

An automatic, or self-winding, movement is a mechanical movement first marketed in the beginning decades of the 20th century. It winds itself while worn on the wrist, eliminating the need for daily hand winding. However, if not worn for some time, the watch will stop and require a manual winding. This does not include taking the watch off before bed.

Components of the automatic movement:

Crown

The wheel on the side of the watch that is used to set time. It can also be turned to wind the watch to run.

Mainspring

The power source of the movement. The kinetic energy from winding the crown is transferred to the coil-shaped mainspring, which stores the energy by getting tighter and tighter.

Gear Train

Transmits the stored energy from the mainspring to the escapement through a series of small gears.

Escapement

Acts like a brake, taking the energy transmitted from the mainspring through the gear train and pushing it out into equal, regular parts.

Balance Wheel

The heart of the movement, receiving the energy to run from the escapement. The balance wheel beats, or oscillates, in a circular motion between five and ten times per second. A watchmaker can make the balance wheel oscillate faster or slower, which in turn makes the watch run faster or slower.

Dial Train

Another series of gears that transmit the regulated, equally metered energy from the balance wheel to the hands of the watch, making them move.

Jewels

Synthetic rubies that are set at points of high friction, like the center of a gear that is constantly in motion. Used as bearings to reduce metal-to-metal friction and wear, they improve performance and accuracy. Rubies are used because they absorb heat well and are extremely hard.

Rotor

A half circle-shaped metal weight attached to the movement that can swing freely in 360 degrees as the wrist moves. The rotor is connected by a series of gears to the mainspring and as it turns, it winds the mainspring, giving the watch energy. The rotor is equipped with a clutch that will disengage it from winding when the mainspring is fully wound.

How automatic movements work:

1. Movement of the wrist turns the rotor, which winds the mainspring. Turning the crown also winds the mainspring.

2. The gear train transfers the energy to the escapement.

3. The escapement meters out the energy into regulated parts.

4. The balance wheel uses this regulated energy to beat back and forth at a constant rate.

5. Every certain number of beats, the dial train transfers the energy to the hands of the watch.

6. The hands advance.

QUARTZ MOVEMENT

A quartz movement uses a battery for its power source and does not need winding like a mechanical watch. It is the most accurate type of movement currently being produced.

Components of the quartz movement:

Battery

Like the mainspring on a mechanical watch, this is the power source of the watch. Typically, the battery on a quartz watch will last between 12 and 24 months before needing to be replaced. It is important to replace the battery as quickly as possible once it has died as there is a possibility of it leaking acid and damaging the movement.

Integrated Circuit

This ‘carries’ the electrical charge between the various parts of the quartz movement.

Quartz Crystal

Performs the same function as the balance wheel on a mechanical watch. The Integrated circuit applies electricity from the battery to the quartz crystal in a constant stream. Quartz vibrates when electricity is applied to it and also generates voltage when it vibrates.

Stepping Motor

Transforms the electrical impulses into mechanical power.

Dial Train

Functions just like the dial train found on a mechanical movement.

How quartz movements work:

1. Electricity is carried from the battery to the quartz crystal via the integrated circuit.

2. The electricity makes the quartz crystal vibrate at a rate of 32,768 per second.

3. These electrical pulses are sent via the integrated circuit to the stepping motor.

4. The stepping motor sends every 32,768th electrical pulse to the dial train.

5. The dial train advances the hands on the watch.

WATCH MATERIALS

WATCH MATERIALS

Traditionally, gold has been the standard material used for watches, but over the years styles and looks have changed. Materials widely used in the automotive, medical, and aerospace industries have permeated horology, inspiring watchmakers to experiment with new lightweight elements and fusions such as:

Stainless Steel

Ceramic

Titanium

Carbon Fiber

Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD)

Diamond-like Carbon (DLC)

Gold

Rubber/Silicone

STAINLESS STEEL

Made of iron-carbon alloy mixed with chromium and nickel

Traits

  • Lightweight
  • Affordable
  • Highly corrosion-resistant

Other uses:

Architecture, monuments, bridges, automotive and aerospace structures, surgical instruments.

CERAMIC

Made of zirconium oxide, a non-metallic material created by the action of heating and cooling

Traits

  • Durable, lightweight, scratch-resistant, smooth and modern
  • Can be produced in a variety of hues and finishes

Other uses:

Jet engines, heat shield that protects NASA space shuttle

TITANIUM

Titanium alloyed with iron, aluminum, vanadium, molybdenum, or other metals

Traits

  • Lightweight, durable, dent and corrosion-resistant
  • Non-allergenic
  • Highest strength-to-weight ratio

Other uses:

Aerospace, naval ships, performance/racing automotive, wide range of medical instruments and sporting goods

CARBON FIBER

Carbon thermally decomposed into braided fibers and surrounded by resin

Traits

  • Tough
  • Lightweight
  • Contemporary style

Other uses:

Aviation, military, space, aeronautic, and medical instruments

PHYSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION (PVD)

Steel with a vacuum coating of oxides, carbides or nitrides, deposited by ionic attraction

Traits

  • Increased durability
  • Reduced friction on metal components

Other uses

Military, automotive, and aerospace

DIAMOND-LIKE CARBON (DLC)

Carbon coating with similar properties to diamond

Traits

  • Ultra-hard with strong resistance to wear and scratches
  • Low friction; slick
  • Resilient to damage or coating dents from physical shock

Other uses

Engines of modern super sport motorcycles, Formula 1 race cars, NASCAR vehicles, aeronautics

GOLD

A metal in which fineness (the percentage of pure gold versus the percentage of base metals) is expressed in karats. 18 karat gold (75 percent pure gold) is standard for watch cases and high grade jewelry in white, yellow, rose and red gold. This is obtained by adjusting the proportions of copper and silver in the 25% of the alloy not consisting of gold.

Yellow Gold

Pure gold alloyed with other metals

White Gold

Pure gold alloyed with silver, palladium, or rhodium.

Rose Gold

Pure gold alloyed with percentages of copper. The more copper added, the darker the hue. A small percentage of silver or zinc can be added for a desired tone.

 

RUBBER / SILICONE

A rubber-like material comprised of silicon, carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen

Traits

  • Heat and cold resistant
  • Good weatherability
  • Water repellent
  • Pleasant to the touch with a high-grade feel

Other uses

Medical applications, consumer electronics, office automation, automobiles, electrical wiring, food

COMMON TECHNICAL WATCH QUESTIONS

AUTOMATIC WATCH QUESTIONS

Though many are built to last more than a lifetime, fine automatic watches are subject to a variety of everyday stresses, from dings to magnetization or contact with rain and perspiration. Below are answers to the most commonly reported issues with mechanical movements that include:

The Movement

The Timing

The Dial

THE MOVEMENT

I dropped my watch and now it doesn't run.

When a watch is dropped, a sudden impact may cause an axle of one or more wheels to break. Most commonly the balance staff, the axle of the wheel that makes the tick-tock noise, breaks. The balance staff will need to be replaced in conjunction with a complete maintenance.

My automatic watch stops after I take it off.

This is a typical occurrence with an automatic watch and may be an indicator of a few problems. An automatic, or self-winding, watch requires a certain amount of physical activity of the wearer to wind fully. If the wearer is not sufficiently active, the watch does not build up enough power to run. In rare cases, it could be that the mainspring has become worn, which sometimes happens after a few years. This is corrected by replacing the mainspring and conducting a complete maintenance.

THE TIMING

My watch was running fine for many years, and now it is running slow and stopping.

A watch is a finely tuned mini-machine. Similar to an automobile's engine, lubricants must be replaced periodically, usually every 3-5 years, to maintain optimum performance. A complete maintenance should correct this.

My watch is running very fast.

This could be for a few reasons. Over time, the internal lubricants in a watch movement may migrate to the hairspring and cause it to stick. It could also be from dropping the watch, in which case the hairspring is out of adjustment. Lastly, the watch may also have been exposed to a magnetic field and become magnetized.

I put on my automatic watch and it is running slow.

Automatic watches must be wound to start the watch running, either by manually winding at the crown or by wearing the watch for a sufficient amount of time to wind the mainspring. When worn regularly, most automatic watches should function normally and continue to run for approximately 36 hours after being removed from the wrist. If the watch is fully wound and still runs slow, this is an indicator that it is due for maintenance. Most manufacturers of automatic watches recommend movement service approximately every 4 to 5 years, depending on the degree of wear/usage.

When I wind my watch, it never stops winding.

This happens in true manual-wind watches and indicates that the mainspring has broken. Automatics have a clutch so you can feel when the watch is fully wound. The mainspring must be replaced along with a complete maintenance.

THE DIAL

The crystal on my watch keeps fogging up and I can't see the dial.

The internal gaskets, which make a watch water resistant, may require replacement or the watch may have been exposed to moisture while the crown was not properly closed. The crown, crystal and back gasket should be replaced in conjunction with a complete maintenance. The watch should be serviced as soon as possible, or other internal components might get damaged. It is important for wearers of water-resistant timepieces to be aware that water resistance is not a permanent feature and requires regular periodic service to be maintained.

The calendar changes at noon.

The hands are 12 hours out of alignment. Reset the watch manually by advancing the time by 12 hours.

The chronograph second hand does not set back to "0."

This may be corrected by a simple manual re-setting of the chronograph hands. Over time, mechanical chronographs will require adjustment. When chronograph hands do not reset to zero, or 12 o'clock, it typically means the watch is due for its regular period maintenance.

QUARTZ WATCH QUESTIONS

The Movement

The Timing

The Battery

The Digital Display

The Push Buttons

THE MOVEMENT

What do I do if my watch has stopped running?

The first step is to see if the battery needs to be replaced. Most watch batteries are designed to last about 2 years. However, some quartz watches are designed to have extended battery life, which can last up to 3 or more years. (Most of these watches do not have second hands). A watch service technician will check the battery and the condition of the contacts.

The second-hand ticks back and forth in one spot and the watch does not run.

This may indicate the watch is functioning electronically, but the mechanical portion is not due to a problem with the internal gearing. Quartz watches have insufficient power to push through obstructions like mainspring-wound watches. In this case, the watch movement most likely needs to be serviced. Although there are numerous conditions that cause this malfunction, it is usually corrected by complete maintenance.

My watch runs fine when I don't wear it, but it stops when I put it on.

This is somewhat of a common problem and could be because the electronic circuitry has a defect. One of the factors causing this to happen can be explained using the principles of basic physics. Expansion occurs when there is an increase in temperature. In this case, the electronic circuit may have a bad contact or defect within. When the watch is off the wrist at room temperature, all of the contact points and circuits function properly. However, when the watch is worn, body temperature causes a slight expansion and the circuit connection to break. This results in the watch no longer functioning. The circuit will need to be replaced in conjunction with a routine maintenance.

My watch always stops at midnight.

The watch is most likely stopping due to a problem with the calendar trip mechanism. You should bring it in for service.

THE TIMING

The second hand skips several seconds at a time.

This is a battery end-of-life indicator (EOL). Watches with this feature have electronic circuits that detect when the battery voltage is getting low. Their circuitry makes the second hand move forward erratically to alert the wearer that it is time to replace the battery. Installing a new battery should restore the second hand to advance normally.

THE BATTERY

I use my chronograph often and the battery life doesn’t last more than a year.

Using the chronograph function often or leaving it running constantly will considerably shorten battery life. It is important to understand that more battery power will be required to enable all of the numerous functions, more so than for basic timekeeping. It is not advisable to run the chronograph/stopwatch function continuously. In fact, some electronic chronograph/stopwatch functions will stop running automatically if left running for extended periods of time. To conserve battery power, it is best to stop the chronograph function when the timing feature is not being used.

I've had the watch for a year. Should I replace the battery just to be safe?

With many of today's quartz watches having an end-of-life (EOL) feature, it is not advisable to replace the battery until it is absolutely necessary. Opening the case presents the possibility of compromising the factory seals, resulting in the need to perform water-resistant maintenance before it is required.

How long does a battery last?

This depends on the age of the watch and the type/ number of functions (i.e., stopwatch chronograph applications, alarms, second hand, etc.). A battery should last for at least 1 year in analog watches and digital styles.

The alarm worked fine until the battery was changed.

Several factors can cause this problem. The most common explanation is that the alarm contact spring is not in the correct position. The watch may need to be sent to the service center. Other possible causes may be the case back was installed incorrectly or there is a problem with the alarm contact plate. The watch will usually need to be sent for service.

THE DIGITAL DISPLAY

The display on my digital watch has turned black and the numbers can no longer be seen.

This usually happens when a digital watch has received a severe shock or has been dropped. The digital display, a very thin sandwich of glass filled with a conductive fluid, has become either contaminated or cracked causing air to leak and damage the conductive fluid. This can be a very expensive repair and, depending on the value of the watch, replacing it may be the most economical alternative. Higher-end digital watches must be sent to the manufacturer's service center.

The digits in my digital display do not show complete numbers or letters.

The contacts connecting the digital display with the circuitry of the watch have been damaged by a shock, or the contact points are corroded. This prevents the section(s) not displayed from receiving necessary voltage to ignite the display segment. In less expensive digital watches, the repair can cost as much as a replacement watch. If the customer wants the watch repaired, it will need to be sent to the manufacturer's service center. Higher-end digital watches can be repaired at a reasonable cost compared to buying a new watch, but they must also be sent to the manufacturer's service center.

The hands work but the digital display doesn't, or vice versa.

Analog/digital combination watches are really two watches built together. It is possible that one will malfunction leaving one-part working. Watches with a digital feature must be repaired by the manufacturer's service center.

THE PUSH BUTTONS

The push buttons don't push in or will not return after being pushed in.

Push buttons have a stem attached to their underside that moves in and out of a tube located inside of the watch when depressed. Inside the watch, a tiny spring pushes the stem back out when the button is released. Over time, dirt or corrosion can accumulate inside the tube resulting in the spring being unable to restore the button back to its original position. The spring will most likely need to be replaced in conjunction with a complete maintenance.

WATCH COMPLICATIONS/FUNCTIONS

WATCH COMPLICATIONS / FUNCTIONS

A complication is any function on a watch other than the display of the time. Complications can range from the very simple and commonplace to extremely rare works of high horology that combine numerous functions and can take years to create. They include:

Date Complications

Chronograph Complications

Dual Time Zone (Travel Complications)

Tourbillon, Moonphase, and Other Complications

DATE COMPLICATIONS

The simplest complication is the addition of a date display.

The four most common varieties of date displays are:

Date Window

The window is also referred to as an aperture. On some watches, the color of the numbers alternates between red and black, which is called “Casino” date display.

 

Big Date

This display allows a much larger view of the date and is significantly more legible than the traditional date window. The variation sometimes has two windows, the left one displaying 0-3, and the right window displaying 0-9.

Pointer Date

A center hand with an arrow or crescent pointing to the date along the outside periphery, or chapter, of the dial. This is sometimes called a “Bankers” date.

Subsidiary Dial

Displays the date on a small subdial and is most often used with other complications.

 

Other varieties of date displays include:

Day-Date

The Day-Date adds the day of the week to the date complication. It is typically set using the crown; moving it in one direction changes the day, while the other direction changes the date. It may also be set using a small indented button on the side of the case with a special tool called a stylus.

 

Triple Calendar

Also called a “complete calendar,” the triple calendar is a further elaboration of date display, adding not only the day of the week but also the month of the year.

Perpetual Calendar

The Perpetual Calendar is the most complex type of calendar feature that exists on a watch, making it highly expensive and rare. It accurately displays the date, day, month, and year, and even takes into account the leap year. It will need correction in 2100, however, when the leap year will be ignored.

Annual Calendar

An annual calendar is a movement of intermediary complication between a perpetual calendar and a triple calendar. It is not programmed to take leap years into account and will continue to run to the 31st in February before advancing to the first of March.

Equation of Time

An Equation of Time (EOT) perpetual calendar is the absolute pinnacle of calendar watches. It incorporates all the features of a standard perpetual calendar with one additional feature: the measurement, in minutes, of the difference between our “calendar time” and the actual “solar time.”

CHRONOGRAPH COMPLICATIONS

Following date complications, the chronograph is the most common complication: a watch that has a stopwatch built into the movement.

Types of Chronographs:

Monopoussoir
(One Button Chronograph)

Originally, all chronographs were “monopoussoirs.” The two-button chronograph was not introduced until 1923 by Breitling. The difference between a one and two button chronograph is that the one button model cannot measure interrupted time spans.

Retour-En-Vol
(Flyback Chronograph)

The Flyback chronograph is specially engineered so that when a second button is pushed while the chronograph is running, all the counters reset and immediately start again from zero. This feature was originally designed for pilots where split second accuracy is necessary for precise navigation. Flybacks are the exception, not the rule.

Rattrapante
(Split-seconds Chronograph)

It’s easy to tell if a chronograph is a rattrapante; it will have three pushers on the case. It also has two second hands on the chronograph, one right on top of the other.

Tachymeter

A Tachymeter is an instrument for measuring speed that is commonly found on watches. Typically, a scale is placed on the outer or inner bezel of a watch and is generally only found in conjunction with chronographs.

A Tachymeter measures units per hour, generally miles or kilometers. In order for a tachymeter to work, you must move at a fixed rate of speed and distance (e.g., 1 mile or 1 kilometer).

 

Chronographs vs. Chronometers

A chronograph is a watch that has a stopwatch built into the movement.

A chronometer is a watch that is certified to be exceptionally precise.

 

DUAL TIME ZONE (TRAVEL COMPLICATIONS)

Dual Time Zone complications help determine the time in another time zone.

Dual Movement

While not technically a complication, the dual movement is a watch that contains two separate movements, each running from their own power source and each set independently.

Dual Time

In dual time watches, both displays are powered by the same movement.

GMT (Greenwich Mean Time)

The watch displays two or more time zones.

GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) with Independent Hour Hand

This variety of GMT is a further development of the original. What makes it different is that the regular hour hand is set independently of the 24 hour hand, which completely changes the functionality of the watch.

GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) with Fixed Hour Hand

Introduced by Rolex in the 1950's, this GMT complication is considered a pilot's watch. Its unique additional hour hand makes one revolution around the dial per day; pointing to twelve indicates midnight and pointing to six indicates noon.

World Time Zone

The World Time Zone feature has a rotating inner bezel with 24-hour display, part of the watch movement, and an outer bezel, listing the major cities in each of the 24 time zones. The outer bezel is set by the user. The inner bezel, marked to 24, makes one complete revolution per day.

TOURBILLON, MOONPHASE, AND OTHER COMPLICATIONS

Moonphase Complication

A traditional and aesthetically pleasing feature, the Moonphase complication shows if it is a full, half, quarter, or new moon. Originally, it was primarily used by sailors to gauge tides.

 

Power Reserve Indicator

The Power Reserve Indicator measures the amount of power remaining in the watch by the tension of the mainspring and displays. Some watches have a power reserve of up to 10 days, in which the indicator displays days, not hours. This useful complication is found exclusively in mechanical watches.

 

Jump Hour

A complication in which the hour is displayed in an aperture that instantly changes every 60 minutes.

 

Alarm (Reveil)

An alarm function can be found on manual, automatic, and quartz movements. An alarm time can be set independently of the main time to remind the wearer of an event. On some models, the movement of the wrist will wind the alarm while on others it is necessary to manually wind it.

 

Minute Repeater

A Minute Repeater is a movement that chimes out time when a lever on the side of the case is activated. It was a fairly common complication for pocket watches around the 18th and 19th centuries and is now produced as a collectable, rather than a tool.

 

The Tourbillon

Invented by A.L. Breguet, the Tourbillon improves the balance of the watch, eliminating timekeeping errors caused by gravity and changing watch positions. Though not strictly necessary for accuracy purposes today, it is commonly appreciated as a feature of high-quality watches. The Tourbillon is extremely rare and requires an enormous amount of time and skill to construct.